December 20, 2014: 4 Weeks Post-Op

I’ll try to separate double mastectomy with reconstruction from chemo during this post.

1. I can sleep in my bed again!

2. I no longer need all my speciality pillows.

3. I can sort of sleep on my side, but I wouldn’t call it all that comfortable yet.

4. I still use my memory foam pillow long wise behind my back in my bed.

5. I still can’t remove all that nasty tape residue from my incision sites which is really starting to drive me a bit crazy.

6. I can make bigger circles with both my arms but extended all the way out or up isn’t happening yet.

7. I can shampoo my own hair now.

8. I can pull an oversized sweatshirt on over my head. Big deal!

9. I can drive now, but I haven’t yet.

10. I can walk up to two miles.

11. I’m still tender at each incision site but not in pain.

12. Had chemo NOT been in the mix, I think I could have gone back to work at least half days this week.

13. My nerves in my skin are still searching for their little lost buddies removed from my breasts. I’ve told them at least a hundred times that they aren’t ever coming back again, but they don’t seem to get it. This is the most painful when I get a chill or I’m cold.

14. I think I still have a few fills remaining before my reconstruction surgery is placed on hold until chemo is complete.

15. Getting used to fake boobs takes some getting used to. They look weird. They feel different. Actually, they don’t feel at all. They are numb which is strange. Don’t get advice from someone who’s had cosmetic surgery. It is not the same.

16. I only notice the expanders when I go from lying flat to sitting up. It takes a minute for them to readjust. I’ve learned to be patient.

17. My chest muscles still feel like I’m knocking out fifty plus push-ups a day.

18. The pain on my left breast bone is still there but getting better. I don’t notice it as often anyway.

19. I’m sleeping better.

20. I’m still healing, so I still need lots of sleep, chemo or not.

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About courage2conquercancer

At the age of 40, I was diagnosed with breast cancer. This is an account of my journey from my discovery and beyond.
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